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I Went to the Woods: A look in the archives

Reading old writing is an experience. It can remind you of how far you’ve come, but is most commonly a reminder of where you were. I’m compiling some old work along with writing a...

On the Trails: Water drops on plants

Gardeners sometimes see leaves fringed with droplets of liquid. The droplets are not dew or rain, and plants don’t sweat. So what are they? Those drops are a way for the plants to excrete...

On the Trails: Electric flowers and platform plants

Many plants produce flowers as a way of attracting animal visitors that can pick up pollen and move it to another flower. Flowers come in an array of colors — all the wavelengths we...

Alaska Science Forum: Where do Alaska bats spend the winter?

Jesika Reimer, a bat expert and consultant, has held in her hands little brown bats from the Northwest Territories to the Tanana River. Along with a few colleagues around Alaska, she is sharing new...

I Went to the Woods: Hunting in the ‘like’ era

Loud and outrageous have become the recipe for commentary. Go to website and it’s a collection of short clips in which personalities make loud and outrageous arguments in the name of engagement. “Goes off…”...

Alaska Science Forum: An attempt to demystify the mysterious

NEAR GAKONA, ALASKA — In this wild place where dump truck drivers once tipped load after load of gravel onto the moss to make roads and building pads, scientists rolled open an iron gate...

On the Trails: All about beavers

Beavers (Castor canadensis) are family-oriented. They live in monogamous pairs (unusual for mammals) with their offspring. There may be several kits of the year plus some one- or two-year olds. Mating occurs in winter,...

Alaska Science Forum: Chasing the sun from New York to Alaska

When I left my sister’s house in Brooklyn yesterday afternoon, I was 4,200 miles from my home. That’s a long way, but I slept in my Fairbanks bed before the next sunrise. Enabling this...

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